Specialty Shelving

  1. Four Ways to Use Epoxy Shelving in the Home

    A lot of people look at ‘epoxy shelving’ and assume that it’s the kind of heavy-duty stuff you only see in factories or restaurants.

    While you’re not wrong for thinking that, the truth is that there’s actually a lot of ways you can use it around the house for safe storage of items that can resist even the crummiest conditions.

    The resilient epoxy coating allows it to withstand cold and moisture while working to inhibit rust and germs, making them a durable and safe option for storage of things you don’t want bothered by bacteria or temperature changes.

    Sounds pretty good, right? Here’s four ways to use them around the house:

     

    Food storage: Rust-proof epoxy shelving is a common sight in a lot of restaurants, stores, and the like for its ability to safely store food under a lot of conditions. The benefits here are two-fold: the epoxy coating helps reduce the spread of germs and helps to prevent the shelf itself from rusting, which could begin to spread to canned goods and anything else stored on the shelf. If you have big pantries that need extra storage space, or if you have space in the garage you keep extra food or beverages, epoxy shelves could be the perfect solution. (Especially if you pair them with canned food organizers for additional storage.)

     

    Basement & garage shelving: In a similar vein, epoxy shelving can also stand up to tough conditions you might encounter in basements or unheated garages. This can come in especially handy for basements that counter a lot of moisture or humidity, as the epoxy coating makes it especially resilient to rust and corrosion, as well as garages that need to store a lot of chemicals and/or more bulky car parts that need somewhere safe to go when not in use.

     

    Houseplants: These days, everyone has a potted plant or two that they want to keep alive. Epoxy shelves are a good call for house plants of any kind for a number of reasons. The open wire design helps light and air flow through, and the epoxy coating will help stop the shelves from rusting in case you get a little overeager with the watering. (Not that you’ve done that...right?)

     

    Safe kitchen storage: The resilient design of epoxy shelving allows for a perfect place to keep things in the kitchen like cooking utensils, pots and pans, or even dishes while they’re drying or not in use. If you have bulkier kitchen goods that need a new home, epoxy shelves can help keep them safer than they would be hanging on the walls or buried in a cabinet somewhere.

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  2. How to Use Wall Space to Organize Clothes

    Whether due to a tiny closet, an overstuffed closet, or maybe no closet at all, a lot of people in apartments or smaller homes have been trying to find creative ways to organize their clothes.

    And while bedroom dressers are a good solution, not everyone’s bedroom has enough space to keep adding dressers—so what’s a fashionable young person to do?

    Have you tried looking on your walls?

    Wall space is a great idea in a lot of situations where extra storage space is needed in smaller rooms, but people tend to overlook its potential for getting your vast collections of belts and sweaters organized. Here’s a few ways we’ve found to make wall storage work for your clothing collection, no matter what your taste in fashion:

     

    Shirts

    Let’s start with one of the most common pieces of anyone’s wardrobe: shirts! Whether you’ve found yourself with a ton of graphic tees from all the concerts you’ve been to or you’re just amassing a collection of nice button-downs for use in the office, you’ve probably wound up with a lot of shirts you need to put somewhere. Luckily walls can be a great place for that. If you have any wall shelves or wire wall shelves already, these can be easily repurposed as shirt racks by putting some hangers on their brackets, or sliding in a thin bar (or wall rail) through the brackets. Any shirts that can be folded and put away can go right on top, while the bar holds onto dress shirts or anything that needs a hanger. For rooms lacking wall shelves, the craftier among you could try installing a few industrial-style pipes or railings to provide hanger space.

     

    Shoes

    No matter how much space you do or don’t have already, shoes are never the best to organize. If you don’t have space for any more shoe racks in your closet, try putting some nails or lower-profile screws into your walls and hang storage bins or decorative baskets from them to hang onto the shoes you wear most often.

     

    Sweaters and jackets

    Heavier stuff like cold-weather clothes tend to take up the most space. A good way to keep them out of your hair until you need them is to repurpose some old wall-mounted bookshelves to keep folded sweaters and jackets until the weather cools down enough to need them again.

     

    Bags and purses

    Finding a place to keep a purse you’re not currently using is one the worst parts of owning a purse, but wall storage can help out. Find an empty wall shelf and line your purses across it (stuffed with tissue paper to help them keep their shape as needed), and once they’re all in place, make sure to use bookends to keep them in place.

     

    Scarves, belts, ties, and other accessories

    So we’re doing good on getting your bigger clothes taken care of, but what about the small stuff that’s easy to lose (and already hard to organize, even if you did have the closet space)? If you have room for a few more shelves, towel racks are the best way to get these smaller items hung. Drape them over the sides of the towel rack to keep them out of the way and easier to get to.

     

    Have you used the wall space in your bedroom or dressing room to keep your clothes organized? Drop a comment and let us know what you did!

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  3. How to Hang Floating Shelves (Safely)

    As befitting their name, floating wall shelves are a stylish type of wall shelving that seem to ‘float’ in midair by hiding their anchor points and obscuring the kind of mounting needed.

    Hanging this style of shelf isn’t quite as difficult as it might sound, however! Much like any other home shelving project, you just need the right tools, the right guidance, and maybe a little patience to get it done. If you’re about to set up those new floating shelves you’ve been thinking about for so long, here’s our quick-and-dirty guide to hanging floating shelves and creating a new accent piece or storage option:

     

    1. Check the type of wall you’ll be hanging it on: Different materials of wall (wood, drywall, etc) require slightly different methods of handling. If you don’t already know what kind of wall you’re dealing with, give it a simple knock—if it sounds hollow, it’s drywall, otherwise it’s likely wood or plaster. (Also, if you’ve been able to easily slide nails through the wall in the past, it’s drywall.)
    2. Look for studs: Ideally, floating shelves should be attached to wall studs as they can provide the greatest support for this sort of shelving, but not all walls have them. Use a stud finder to locate potential anchor points, or tap around the harder points in a plaster wall to identify the source of studs.
    3. Get the right kind of mounts: Floating shelves, true to their name, use smaller anchors to connect to the wall than other types of shelves so they can keep up the illusion of ‘floating’. Many floating shelves will come with the anchors you need, but if not, make sure to double-check the style of anchor (or ‘molly plug’) you need.
    4. Measure and mark the correct space on the wall: Identify where the anchors will go on the shelf and make the correct corresponding marks on the wall.
    5. Trace the shelf’s location: Use a level to trace a line between these newly drawn anchor points and make sure the shelf will sit flush and straight on the wall.
    6. Get drilling: Take your favorite drill and make pilot holes into the wall where the anchors will sit.
    7. Insert anchors: Place the anchors into the newly-drilled holes (making sure to follow any provided instructions, of course).
    8. Get aligned: Line up your shelf and/or bracket with the anchor-filled pilot holes, then take a regular screwdriver and attach the bracket into the wall by screwing into the anchors.
    9. Lay the shelf down: All you should have to do now is place the shelf onto the bracket (or directly onto the anchors, as the design calls for) and you’re done!

     

    Have you hung up a wall shelf recently? Got any tales of victory (or woe) you want to share? Leave them in the comments below!

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  4. Tips for Organizing with Open Shelving

    “Openness” has been an increasingly popular trend in home & apartment design lately, and that goes from the floor plan to the closet and all the way to the home shelving you use.

    Open shelving has been popping up in living spaces of all sizes thanks to its ease of installation and even greater ease of use—but is it right for your home?

    Above and beyond the decorative aspects of it, open wall shelves can actually do a lot to help keep the various rooms of your home better organized while providing a nice visual enhancement, even if you’re just using them to help keep your rooms cleaner.

    Check out a few ways that open shelving can help around your house:

     

    The Kitchen

    Open shelves, especially more durable ones like metal wall shelves, are always a good decision inside kitchens due to their ease of access—and let’s face it, you probably have a good amount of stuff in your kitchen that could use a more organized home. Depending on where they’re placed, open shelves are perfect for storing dry ingredients (spices, herbs, sugar, etc), serving trays or mixing bowls, or utensils (but try not to keep them too close to the oven to prevent heat issues!) right where you need them most without having to fight through the old junk drawer.

     

    Living Rooms

    In the living room, open shelves are a great way to reduce clutter while also giving you more opportunity to decorate a little bit. Unless you need them to support a ton of weight, more ‘decorative’ shelving options like glass wall shelves and wood wall shelves can match a variety of previously-existing living room decorations (so you never have to fret about it matching your mom’s couch that you were gifted). These can be a good spot for books you want to display (either old favorites or something you’ve been meaning to read), family photos or knicknacks you’re particularly fond of, or just some small succulents or cacti. A good tip is to remember what you’re stacking on them, though—areas prone to bad windstorms or earthquakes might not want to put your old porcelain that high off the ground.

     

    Dining Rooms

    Most dining rooms seem to be full of a ton of stuff you use all the time, and almost as much stuff that you don’t. While your everyday-use dishes, silverware, and the like are better off kept accessible at ground level, open shelving can be a great way to store things like stemware and those fancy plates you got on your wedding day that you’re saving for just the right time and place. Pair it with a wall mounted wine rack to help keep all your entertaining wine right at the dinner table where you need it.

     

    Bathrooms

    Bathrooms tend to be harder to organize than you’d expect—there’s already closets and cabinets, but those can fill up quickly and, well, there’s a lot of stuff we need to keep in bathrooms isn’t there? Open shelves can solve a lot of those problems. Try putting some up on the wall closest to your shower to help organize towels and keep them right at hand where you need them, or hang one up over the toilet (ideally high enough and far enough back to prevent bumping into it with your head) to keep paper towels, toilet paper, and any other needed bathroom supply where you can quickly get to it.

     

    We’ll be back soon with more open shelving organization tips, but in the meantime leave a comment below if you’ve recently put wall shelving up in your home and tell us what you think!

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  5. Ideas & Uses for Floating Shelves

    Named for their ability to mount seamlessly to the wall and look like they’re, well, floating, floating shelves have been a staple in home decoration for decades.

    Different from standard wall shelves thanks to their lighter profile and range of materials, floating shelves can make a big difference in home organization and storage when used properly.

    Have you been thinking about some floating shelves but just aren’t sure where they will go? Or are you just looking to see how other people use them to see if you want to try them out yourself? Check out a few of these ideas we’ve found and see what one works best for your home or apartment:

     

    DIY nightstands: Some floating shelves, such as floating ledge shelves are dense enough to be installed low near the bed and used as nightstands! These shelves take up way less space than your average end table and are great for low-profile storage of things like glasses and lamps in areas where there’s not enough room for a whole end table or nightstand.

     

    Filling in corners: With both standard floating shelves and floating corner shelves, these shelves are a great way to utilize corners for storage needs. Line up two floating shelves in an L-shape to bridge any corner gaps and keep things neatly arranged where you can get to them.

     

    Open vertical storage: Of course, the goal of any shelf is to let you store things better, and in smaller apartments or homes that lack in closets or shelving, floating shelves are a great low-profile way to add storage space. Particularly in rooms where you need easy access to a lot of small things, like the laundry room, the home office, or even that corner of the basement where your toolboxes all wind up, floating shelves can provide unobstructed access to whatever you need to declutter.

     

    Opening up the kitchen: Speaking of which, a lot of kitchens are moving towards a more open, ‘door-less’ design using floating shelves to store things like dishes and cooking utensils without the claustrophobic look that cabinets can sometimes provide. Floating shelves can easily replace cabinets, particularly over the oven or the sink, and provide a more dynamic look while keeping everything even easier to reach.

     

    Converting tight spaces: Small spaces like removed cabinets, gaps in the walls, or even disused medicine cabinets in bathrooms and bedrooms can be easily filled in with floating shelves to provide extra storage in areas that might not have been too useful before. Take some time to find those hard, out-of-the-way spots in your house and put them to work with shelves.

    Do you have floating shelves in your home? Let us know how you use them in a comment below!

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